BNAIC 2010

Invited Speakers

Jerome Lang

Incomplete knowledge and communication issues in voting

Jérôme Lang

Senior Resercher at CNRS, Paris, France

Abstract:

Computational social choice is a rapidly emerging research topic, located at the crossing point between social choice and computer science (and especially AI). One of the key problems in computational social choice is the determination of the winning alternative(s) when the knowledge about the voters' preferences is incomplete. This incompleteness may have several possible causes: voters who forget to send their vote, as typical in Doodle polls; new candidates appearing in the course of the process, on which the voters haven't expressed any opinion yet; voters refusing to compare two alternatives because their preference depends on an exogenous event; etc. In these situations, one may try to identify the alternatives that can still win when the voters' preferences are eventually fully known, and one may also try to build interactive protocols for asking the agents enough of the missing information so as to be able to compute the winning alternative(s) while trying to minimize the amount of communication. This talk will give a survey of this hot topic, and relate it to closely related issues, such as the computational resistance to strategic behaviour.

Biosketch:

Jérôme Lang is a senior researcher ("directeur de recherche") at Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. Since 2008 he is affiliated with the Laboratoire d'Analyse et de Modélisation de Systèmes d'Aide à la Décision (LAMSADE), Université Paris-Dauphine.
From 1991 to 2008 he was a CNRS researcher at Institut de Recherche en Informatique de Toulouse. His research interests span a large part of Artificial Intelligence, especially Knowledge Representation and Multi-Agent Systems. His recent research activities focus on preference representation and computational social choice.

Jerome Lang

The Algorithm is the Message: AI as an Expressive Medium

Michael Mateas

Associate Professor, Computer Science Department, University of California, Santa Cruz

Abstract:

Modern videogames have made use of ever more sophisticated AI techniques, ranging from real time planning and behavior selection for NPCs, to robust path planning in complex environments, to strategic and tactical decision making for real-time and turn-based strategy games. But the real promise of game AI, and more generally AI-based art and entertainment, lies in the possibilities of enabling new forms of interactive experiences. This talk will describe the research and design challenges that arise from a focus on AI as an expressive medium.

Biosketch:

Michael Mateas's research in AI-based art and entertainment combines science, engineering and design to push the frontiers of interactive entertainment. Michael is recognized internationally as a leader in AI-based interactive storytelling. He is currently a faculty member in the Computer Science department at UC Santa Cruz, where he holds the MacArthur Endowed Chair. With Andrew Stern, Michael released Facade, the world´s first AI-based interactive drama.
Facade has received significant attention, including top honors at the Slamdance independent game festival. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University.